Banner Health safety experts alert parents on kids’ costume dangers

By Banner Health

Halloween will be here sooner than we know it and as parents and kids begin to plan their 2019 Halloween costumes, Banner Health safety experts have some suggestions on how to costumes that the right kind of scary.

“Halloween can be especially dangerous for tricker-treaters. ’’It usually is dark outside when they go house to house. There is a lot of excitement, maybe a little sugar-induced energy and we just want to make sure the costumes don’t add to the problems.

“We want everyone to be safe at Halloween,’’ said Melissa Luxton, trauma-prevention coordinator at Banner – University Medical Center Phoenix.

Luxton gives a rundown of how to make take the scary out of some of the more popular Halloween kids’ costumes:

Princesses: On Halloween night, there are more princesses out there than at a royal wedding. Trim a couple inches off the princess’ gown to prevent tripping and falling. Also, princesses should wear comfortable shoes and leave the high heels home. Wearing lighter-color finery will make any princess easier to see at night.

Superheroes: Check their masks to make sure that they are easy to see out of. And make sure that the costume fits well, so there is no tripping. Outfit your superhero with a crime-fighting glow stick that can help them be more visible.

Ninjas: The can be a very scary costume since it is in all-black. Attach some reflective tape down the sides of the costume so that drivers can see your little ninja. That way, the costume looks scary from the front and is safe from the sides.

Witches: There are all kinds of witches: vampire witches, day-of-the-dead witches, zombie witches. No matter which one you choose, you can apply face make-up instead of a clumsy mask to get a great costume. Unfortunately, witches usually wear all black, so go with reflective strips or make sure the witch’s broom is glow-in-the dark.

About Banner Health

Headquartered in Arizona, Banner Health is one of the largest nonprofit health care systems in the country. The system owns and operates 28 acute-care hospitals, Banner Health Network, Banner – University Medicine, academic and employed physician groups, long-term care centers, outpatient surgery centers and an array of other services; including Banner Urgent Care, family clinics, home care and hospice services, pharmacies and a nursing registry. Banner Health is in six states: Arizona, California, Colorado, Nebraska, Nevada and Wyoming. For more information, visit
www.BannerHealth.com

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